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Newton's Three Laws




 
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More Lessons for High School Physics, Math Worksheets

A series of free Online High School Physics Video Lessons.

In this lesson, we will learn

  • Newton's first law of motion - Law of Inertia
  • Newton's second law of motion - Law of Force and Acceleration
  • Newton's third law of motion - Law of Action and Reaction
Law of Inertia - Newton's First Law of Motion
According to Newton's first law of motion, also known as the Law of Inertia, an object at rest remains at rest and an object in motion remains in motion until it is acted upon by an unbalanced force.
Understanding and applying the Law of Inertia.
Newton's First Law (Galileo's Law of Inertia).
Law of Force and Acceleration - Newton's Second Law of Motion
According to Newton's Second Law of Motion, also known as the Law of Force and Acceleration, a force upon an object causes it to accelerate according to the formula net force = mass x acceleration. So the acceleration of the object is directly proportional to the force and inversely proportional to the mass.
Understanding and applying the Law of Force and Acceleration.
Newton's Second Law of Motion: F = ma



Law of Action and Reaction - Newton's Third Law of Motion
The Newton's Third Law of Motion states that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. Simply put, it means that every force can be undone. Mathematically, it means that for every vector there is another vector with opposite direction and equal magnitude.
Understanding and applying the Law of Action and Reaction.
Every action has an equal and opposite reaction


 

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