OML Search

Inverse Sine, Cosine and Tangent




 
Related Topics:
More Lessons for Trigonometry

Math Worksheets

A series of free, online Trigonometry Video Lessons.
Videos, worksheets, and activities to help Trigonometry students.

In this lesson, we will learn

  • the inverse sine function and its graph
  • the inverse cosine function and its graph
  • the inverse tangent function and its graph
  • how to evaluate inverse trigonometric expressions


Inverse Sine Function

Since sine is not a one-to-one function, the domain must be limited to − π/2 to π/2, which is called the restricted sine function. The inverse sine function is written as sin−1(x) or arcsin(x). Inverse functions swap x- and y-values, so the range of inverse sine is − π/2 to π/2 and the domain is −1 to 1. When evaluating problems, use identities or start from the inside function.
How to restrict the domain of sine so it will have an inverse function.
How to graph the inverse sine function



Inverse Cosine Function

Since cosine is not a one-to-one function, the domain must be limited to 0 to π, which is called the restricted cosine function. The inverse cosine function is written as cos−1(x) or arccos(x). Inverse functions swap x- and y-values, so the range of inverse cosine is 0 to π and the domain is −1 to 1. When evaluating problems, use identities or start from the inside function.
How to restrict the domain of cosine so it will have an inverse function.

Inverse Tangent Function

Since tangent is not a one-to-one function, the domain must be limited to − π/2 to π/2, which is called the restricted tangent function. The graph of the inverse tangent function is a reflection of the restricted tangent function over y = x. Note that the vertical asymptotes become horizontal, at y = π/2 and y = − π/2, and the domain and ranges swap for the inverse function.
How to restrict the domain of tangent so it will have an inverse function.


 
Introduction to the inverse functions of sine, cosine, and tangent
Define the inverse functions of sine, cosine, and tangent
Graph the inverse functions of sine, cosine, and tangent
Use inverse trigonometric functions to solve functions

Using the Inverse Trigonometric Functions

In a problem where two trig functions are not inverses of each other (also known as "inverse trigonometric functions"),
(1) replace the inverse function with a variable (which represents an angle),
(2) use the definition of the inverse function to draw the angle in the unit circle and identify one coordinate,
(3) find the missing coordinate (use Pythagorean Theorem, for example),
(4) use the coordinates to find the missing value.
This video provides examples of evaluating inverse trigonometric expressions using the unit circle.


This video provides examples of evaluating inverse trigonometric expressions using reference triangles.
This video provides examples of evaluating inverse trigonometric expressions using the unit circle.  inverse cosecant, inverse secant, inverse cotangent.


 
This video provides and example of how to evaluate a trigonometric expression containing an inverse trigonometric function.
tan(sin−1(−12/13))
sin(arctan(−7))
sin(tan−1(u/3))

This video provides examples of simplifying expressions with inverse trig functions and trig functions.
sin(sin−1(2/5)) , cos(cos−1(−2/7)), tan(cos−1(2/3))
This video provides examples of simplifying expressions with inverse trig functions and trig functions.
sin−1(sin(π/3)), sin−1(cos(−3π/4)), tan−1(sin(−π/6))
How to evaluate expressions like tan(sin−1(4/5)).


Rotate to landscape screen format on a mobile phone or small tablet to use the Mathway widget, a free math problem solver that answers your questions with step-by-step explanations.


You can use the free Mathway widget below to practice Algebra or other math topics. Try the given examples, or type in your own problem and check your answer with the step-by-step explanations.


OML Search


We welcome your feedback, comments and questions about this site or page. Please submit your feedback or enquiries via our Feedback page.


[?] Subscribe To This Site

XML RSS
follow us in feedly
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My MSN
Subscribe with Bloglines