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Dilations




 
Videos and lessons to help High School students learn how to verify experimentally the properties of dilations given by a center and a scale factor:

A. A dilation takes a line not passing through the center of the dilation to a parallel line, and leaves a line passing through the center unchanged.

B. The dilation of a line segment is longer or shorter in the ratio given by the scale factor.

Common Core: HSG-SRT.A.1

Related Topics:
Common Core (Geometry)

Common Core for Mathematics

Dilations in Geometric Figures
This video explains the concept of dilating a geometric figure, scale factor, and work through some basic examples involving dilating figures.

Dilation and Scale Factor Part 1
In this lesson dilation and scale factor are defined. Then using examples we discuss positive and negative scale factor as well as scale factors that are greater than or less than one.



Dilation and Scale Factor Part 2
In this lesson we calculate scale factor and show dilation on a graph (coordinate plane).
Constructing a Dilation
Using a compass and straight edge to construct the dilation of a geometric shape.


 
Dilations in Two Dimensions
This Demonstration allows you to explore some of the features of dilation , also called expansion or enlargement, in two dimensions. You can change the center of dilation. You can drag or add locators to change the shape of the object. You can also see the lines joining vertices to their images. This Demonstration is designed as a class activity, so by projecting the image on a whiteboard or an interactive board, students can demonstrate their skill by predicting the position of any hidden object.



 

Rotate to landscape screen format on a mobile phone or small tablet to use the Mathway widget, a free math problem solver that answers your questions with step-by-step explanations.


You can use the free Mathway widget below to practice Algebra or other math topics. Try the given examples, or type in your own problem and check your answer with the step-by-step explanations.


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