The Adverb

Nouns and pronouns are modified by adjectives. Verbs and adjectives may have modifiers, too, and their modifiers are called adverbs.

An adverb is a word used to modify (describe) a verb, an adjective, or another adverb.

In this lesson, we will learn about

  • adverbs that modify verbs
  • adverbs that modify adjectives
  • adverbs that modify other adverbs
  • conjunctive adverbs

 

 

Adverbs Modifying Verbs

Sometimes an adverb modifies a verb. Adverbs modify verbs by answering one of these questions:

Where? When? How? How much?

Examples:

Where?

Stand here. (Verb – stand, Adverb – here)

I moved forward. (Verb – moved, Adverb – forward)

When?

I will eat later. (Verb – eat, Adverb – later)

Did you go immediately? (Verb – go, Adverb – immediately)

How?

I quickly moved. (Verb – moved, Adverb – quickly)

Did it move slowly? (Verb – move, Adverb – slowly)

How much?

I barely slept. (Verb – slept, Adverb – barely)

Did you go far? (Verb – go, Adverb – far)

 

 

Adverbs Modifying Adjectives

Sometimes an adverb modifies an adjective.

Examples:

She is an exceptionally good student. (exceptionally is the adverb that modifies the adjective good, which modifies the noun student.)

The house was strangely quiet. (strangely is the adverb that modifies the adjective quiet, which modifies the noun house.)

The following adverbs frequently modify adjectives:

too

very

quite

extremely

entirely

unusually

dangerously

definitely

especially

completely

surprisingly

terribly

dreadfully

suddenly

dreadfully

 

 

Adverbs Modifying Other Adverbs

Sometimes an adverb modifies another adverb.

Examples:

She is almost always busy. (almost is the adverb that modifies the adverb always which modifies the verb busy)

They saw it rather recently. (rather is the adverb that modifies the adverb recently which modifies the verb saw)

 

 

Conjunctive Adverbs

We can use a conjunctive adverb to join two independent clauses together. Some of the most common conjunctive adverbs are:

also

consequently

finally

furthermore

hence

however

incidentally

indeed

instead

likewise

meanwhile

nevertheless

next

nonetheless

otherwise

still

then

therefore

thus

 

 

Each clause linked by a conjunctive adverb remains independent and can stand alone. If the clauses are to be placed in a single sentence they must be separated by a semicolon.

Example:

She went to the store; however, she did not buy anything. (however is the conjunctive adverb that joins the two independent clauses she went to the store and she did not buy anything)

 

 

Videos

What is an Adverb?
Adverbs describe verbs, other adverbs and some adjectives.  They never describe nouns.



Adjective or Adverb
An easy to understand tutorial explaining the most important rules of the formation and usage of adjectives and adverbs; in English

 

 

What are Adjectives and Adverbs?
Adjectives are used to describe nouns and pronouns, while adverbs are used to describe verbs and other adverbs. Discover when to use modifiers and what suffixes signify adverbs.

What is an Adverb Clause?
The following video explains how an adverb clause is used in a sentence.

 

 

Conjunctive Adverbs
A semicolon is used before conjunctive adverbs to join two independent clauses together. Discover why semicolons are used with conjunctive adverbs

The following video explains how to use the conjunctive adverb "therefore" in a few sentences.

 

 

 

Custom Search

 

We welcome your feedback, comments and questions about this site - please submit your feedback via our Feedback page.

 

© Copyright 2005, 2012 - onlinemathlearning.com
Embedded content, if any, are copyrights of their respective owners.


Useful Links:
More Geometry Help on MathWorld

 

 

   

 

Custom Search